wild and captive orcas truth


The blog that's a companion to the facebook page of the same name.

Ask Us About Anything That's About Marine Life.
happygeckostickysituation:

Happy World Snake Day from Happy Gecko Sticky Situation!www.happygeckostickers.etsy.com

happygeckostickysituation:

Happy World Snake Day from Happy Gecko Sticky Situation!

www.happygeckostickers.etsy.com

Source: happygeckostickysituation

lanatura:


Noctis by Lincoln Harrison

lanatura:

Source: 500px.com

lanatura:


Noctis by Lincoln Harrison

lanatura:

Source: 500px.com

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 
Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 
In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 
Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 
Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling. 

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 

Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 

In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 

Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 

Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling

shamurocks:

Kona2,Kalina,Katina by Shamufan88 on Flickr.

shamurocks:

Kona2,Kalina,Katina by Shamufan88 on Flickr.

Source: shamurocks

did-you-kno:

Source

did-you-kno:

Source

Source: didyouknowblog.com

aleksidraws:

With only about 50 individuals left, the Maui’s Dolphin is likely doomed to go extinct without immediate help. To help them and lots of other cetaceans, don’t purchase sea food that was caught with gill nets, and if you really want to play it safe, don’t buy seafood at all! We don’t need fish to live anyway, but dolphins and other sea predators do.
Petitions:www.change.org/en-CA/petitions…
http://www.wwf.org.nz/take_action/maui_s_campaign_/be_a_maui_s_advocate/

aleksidraws:

With only about 50 individuals left, the Maui’s Dolphin is likely doomed to go extinct without immediate help. To help them and lots of other cetaceans, don’t purchase sea food that was caught with gill nets, and if you really want to play it safe, don’t buy seafood at all! We don’t need fish to live anyway, but dolphins and other sea predators do.

Petitions:
www.change.org/en-CA/petitions…

http://www.wwf.org.nz/take_action/maui_s_campaign_/be_a_maui_s_advocate/

Source: aleksidraws

animal-hearted:

My lock screen makes me happy…Seal Lions make me happy 😊

animal-hearted:

My lock screen makes me happy…Seal Lions make me happy 😊

Source: cetagifs

thestrandingorcas:

ID: PTN-018 and PTN-020   Born2008

First seen: 2008   Last seen: This season

This profile seems to be about two orcas, but is in fact not. The one orca in focus is the youngest calf of Ishtar, a today 6 year old of unknown gender. It was seen traveling with its mother in March 2008, and given the name Shekei in December the same year. The calf was always seen with its mother, but the two were last seen in April 2010, both directly assumed disappeared. That same summer, two ‘new’ young orcas were seen traveling with the two orcas - Llen and Pao - that used to travel with Ishtar. The two newcomers were in 2012 named Jaluel and Golouen. The group of four has been observed around in Patagonia a lot since then, Jaluel proving to be a good stranding hunter, while Golouen is still very young, and didn’t seem to have a mother around that could teach it the technique. 

In mid June this year, PNOR briefly announced on their Facebook page that Golouen is in fact ishtar's lost calf. All the info on the two individuals fits together, and in retrospect it's easy to question why this was not realized earlier, or simply assumed when the calf was seen with its siblings after the mothers disappearance.  
The ‘more detailed information’ that PNOR promise on the case will most likely be given when the team comes back from the field and bad internet connection - and I’ll make sure to let you know!

(x) (x) (x)

Source: thestrandingorcas